landlab dance exchange

Walkabout: Remembering Water’s Way, with Dance Exchange

Culminating a year of research and artmaking at the Schuylkill Center, Dance Exchange will lead a series of animated hikes on our trails that connect participants to local ecology and reflect on the ways that water shapes our lives.  These hour-long experiences will weave together performance, installation, science engagements, and other opportunities, surfacing concerns and questions about the Schuylkill River and local waterways, and contributing to our understandings about the impacts of climate change on the region.

Executive Artistic Director of Dance Exchange Cassie Meador is collaborating with a multidisciplinary team of artists and scientists (Elizabeth Johnson, Jame McCray, and Zeke Leonard, along with Schuylkill Center staff) and a cohort of local artists to create this unique interdisciplinary event.

The guided walk will descend some elevation; good walking shoes are recommended.

 

Performances will take place at the following times:

October 13 from 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

October 13 from 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

October 14 from 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

October 14 from 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

 

Dance Exchange is a Takoma Park, MD-based non-profit arts organization committed to dancemaking and creative practices that engage individuals and communities of all ages to cultivate a deeper understanding of themselves and their world, and to open up the questions at the heart of their lives. Founded in 1976 by Liz Lerman and under the artistic direction of Cassie Meador since 2011, Dance Exchange creates dances by asking four questions: Who gets to dance? Where is the dance happening? What is it about?  Why does it matter? For the past decade, much of Dance Exchange’s work has focused on the intersection of the arts and sciences and has resulted in collaborations between scientists in the fields of biology, physics, ecology, genetics and more.

This program is presented as part of the Schuylkill Center’s LandLab residencyLandLab integrates artistic creation, ecological restoration and education. A joint project of the Schuylkill Center and the Center for Emerging Visual Artists (CFEVA), LandLab offers resources and space on our 340-acre wooded property for artists to engage audiences in the processes of ecological stewardship through scientific investigation and artistic creation. LandLab residents create art-based installations that prevent or remediate environmental damage while raising public awareness about our local ecology.

landlab dance exchange

LandLab: Dance Exchange

Culminating a year of research and artmaking at the Schuylkill Center, Dance Exchange will lead a series of animated hikes on our trails that connect participants to local ecology and reflect on the ways that water shapes our lives.  These hour-long experiences will weave together performance, installation, science engagements, and other opportunities, surfacing concerns and questions about the Schuylkill River and local waterways, and contributing to our understandings about the impacts of climate change on the region.

Executive Artistic Director of Dance Exchange Cassie Meador is collaborating with a multidisciplinary team of artists and scientists (Elizabeth Johnson, Jame McCray, and Zeke Leonard, along with Schuylkill Center staff) and a cohort of local artists to create this unique interdisciplinary event.

The guided walk will descend some elevation; good walking shoes are recommended.

Dance Exchange is a Takoma Park, MD-based non-profit arts organization committed to dancemaking and creative practices that engage individuals and communities of all ages to cultivate a deeper understanding of themselves and their world, and to open up the questions at the heart of their lives. Founded in 1976 by Liz Lerman and under the artistic direction of Cassie Meador since 2011, Dance Exchange creates dances by asking four questions: Who gets to dance? Where is the dance happening? What is it about?  Why does it matter? For the past decade, much of Dance Exchange’s work has focused on the intersection of the arts and sciences and has resulted in collaborations between scientists in the fields of biology, physics, ecology, genetics and more.

This program is presented as part of the Schuylkill Center’s LandLab residency. LandLab integrates artistic creation, ecological restoration and education. A joint project of the Schuylkill Center and the Center for Emerging Visual Artists (CFEVA), LandLab offers resources and space on our 340-acre wooded property for artists to engage audiences in the processes of ecological stewardship through scientific investigation and artistic creation. LandLab residents create art-based installations that prevent or remediate environmental damage while raising public awareness about our local ecology.

landlab dance exchange

Walkabout: Remembering Water’s Way, with Dance Exchange

Culminating a year of research and artmaking at the Schuylkill Center, Dance Exchange will lead a series of animated hikes on our trails that connect participants to local ecology and reflect on the ways that water shapes our lives.  These hour-long experiences will weave together performance, installation, science engagements, and other opportunities, surfacing concerns and questions about the Schuylkill River and local waterways, and contributing to our understandings about the impacts of climate change on the region.

Executive Artistic Director of Dance Exchange Cassie Meador is collaborating with a multidisciplinary team of artists and scientists (Elizabeth Johnson, Jame McCray, and Zeke Leonard, along with Schuylkill Center staff) and a cohort of local artists to create this unique interdisciplinary event.

The guided walk will descend some elevation; good walking shoes are recommended.

 

Performances will take place at the following times:

October 13 from 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

October 13 from 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

October 14 from 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

October 14 from 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

 

Dance Exchange is a Takoma Park, MD-based non-profit arts organization committed to dancemaking and creative practices that engage individuals and communities of all ages to cultivate a deeper understanding of themselves and their world, and to open up the questions at the heart of their lives. Founded in 1976 by Liz Lerman and under the artistic direction of Cassie Meador since 2011, Dance Exchange creates dances by asking four questions: Who gets to dance? Where is the dance happening? What is it about?  Why does it matter? For the past decade, much of Dance Exchange’s work has focused on the intersection of the arts and sciences and has resulted in collaborations between scientists in the fields of biology, physics, ecology, genetics and more.

This program is presented as part of the Schuylkill Center’s LandLab residencyLandLab integrates artistic creation, ecological restoration and education. A joint project of the Schuylkill Center and the Center for Emerging Visual Artists (CFEVA), LandLab offers resources and space on our 340-acre wooded property for artists to engage audiences in the processes of ecological stewardship through scientific investigation and artistic creation. LandLab residents create art-based installations that prevent or remediate environmental damage while raising public awareness about our local ecology.

landlab dance exchange

Walkabout: Remembering Water’s Way, with Dance Exchange

Culminating a year of research and artmaking at the Schuylkill Center, Dance Exchange will lead a series of animated hikes on our trails that connect participants to local ecology and reflect on the ways that water shapes our lives.  These hour-long experiences will weave together performance, installation, science engagements, and other opportunities, surfacing concerns and questions about the Schuylkill River and local waterways, and contributing to our understandings about the impacts of climate change on the region.

Executive Artistic Director of Dance Exchange Cassie Meador is collaborating with a multidisciplinary team of artists and scientists (Elizabeth Johnson, Jame McCray, and Zeke Leonard, along with Schuylkill Center staff) and a cohort of local artists to create this unique interdisciplinary event.

The guided walk will descend some elevation; good walking shoes are recommended.

 

Performances will take place at the following times:

October 13 from 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

October 13 from 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

October 14 from 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

October 14 from 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

 

Dance Exchange is a Takoma Park, MD-based non-profit arts organization committed to dancemaking and creative practices that engage individuals and communities of all ages to cultivate a deeper understanding of themselves and their world, and to open up the questions at the heart of their lives. Founded in 1976 by Liz Lerman and under the artistic direction of Cassie Meador since 2011, Dance Exchange creates dances by asking four questions: Who gets to dance? Where is the dance happening? What is it about?  Why does it matter? For the past decade, much of Dance Exchange’s work has focused on the intersection of the arts and sciences and has resulted in collaborations between scientists in the fields of biology, physics, ecology, genetics and more.

This program is presented as part of the Schuylkill Center’s LandLab residency. LandLab integrates artistic creation, ecological restoration and education. A joint project of the Schuylkill Center and the Center for Emerging Visual Artists (CFEVA), LandLab offers resources and space on our 340-acre wooded property for artists to engage audiences in the processes of ecological stewardship through scientific investigation and artistic creation. LandLab residents create art-based installations that prevent or remediate environmental damage while raising public awareness about our local ecology.

Canoeing

Day-off Camps: Aquatic Adventure

When schools are closed, we’re open! Bring your kids to the Schuylkill Center for a day of fun and exploration. We’ll take a deep dive into aquatic habitats as we search for tadpoles in wetlands, hike along the stream, and canoe on Wind Dance Pond. Wear a bathing suit and water-friendly clothing. Extended day until 6:00 pm is available for an additional $15/day.

For ages 5–12 | 8:00 am–3:00 pm | Members: $52 | Non-members: $62. Programs with a field trip may include an additional fee. Registration is required.

Please note, day-off camps will be cancelled ONE WEEK PRIOR if the minimum number of participants is not reached by then. Please register soon; space is limited.

This event has reached capacity. Thank you all for your interest in this event!

 

The Art of Wood Bending

By Carolyn Hesse

Carolyn Hesse is a resident artist part of our summer gallery, Wet Lab, a space for artists and Schuylkill Center visitors to explore and reflect on water in a dynamic environment.

 

For most artists, success is predicated on having enough time to work creatively.

This is true for me as well. Having time to make mistakes—and grow from them—is what drives every endeavor and can be what makes or breaks the spirit. So, to be given the gift of time at the Schuylkill Center was like a jewel that emits light at every angle; a non-objective based chunk of creative time immersed in a woodland setting. Wet Lab was consciously, and generously, set up as an open-ended concept. As result, it became a breath of fresh air in my artistic practice.

I used the time to make pieces for a current body of work that deals with wave and water imagery, titled: (i kept your sea ( i kept it safe)).  Springhouse Pond is down the hill behind the Discovery Center and I used it to soak strips of cedar of different lengths and widths for different amounts of time. I then brought the wood up to the gallery to bend and clamp them around forms where they would dry into the curves of those forms. Or break.

 

Either way, the experience was useful. These are some images of my process.

 

 

If you enjoy them, feel free to check on my website (carolynhessestudio.com) in the near future to see what they become after they’ve been cleaned up, sanded down, and incorporated into new sculptural pieces. My gratitude and appreciation for everyone I came into contact with at SCEE couldn’t be more heartfelt, thank you!

About the Author

Carolyn Hesse is one of our Wet Lab artists whose work is influenced by her time spent working for a wooden boat builder for 11 years. Her work is influenced by traditional wooden boat building techniques and she likes to engage in the idea of suspension, in the literal spatial, chemical sense, and the ephemeral sense related to time. Her pieces explore these concepts through visual repetition as well as reference to the straight line and the horizon. More recently she has been creating pieces that are less formal and more narrative.

 

Wet Lab is the current project in the Schuylkill Center’s gallery, on view until August 18, and is a space for artists and Schuylkill Center visitors to explore and reflect on water in a dynamic environment.  Over the course of the summer, twenty artists are responding to water in a variety of media, and presenting their work and process in our gallery for two to three week periods. Artists display completed works along with works in progress, at times using the gallery as their studio to work through a new idea or test creative hypotheses. Artist Carolyn Hesse participated in Wet Lab for three weeks in June and July, and reflects on her experience in this post.

Getting Millennials to Care More about the Environment

By Whitney Works, Intern for SCEE’s Environmental Art Department

Working with the Environmental Art Department of the Schuylkill Center has piqued my interest in a few things. While I recognize my own conservation habits, I can’t help but wonder about my colleagues and other Millennials (those aged 18-29). Those outside of the environmental science or nonprofit sphere; how do they view the environment and its pressing issues?

Surprisingly, the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology published a study earlier this year finding that Millennials were more civically and politically disengaged and less concerned about helping the larger community than GenX and Baby Boomers were at the same ages.

So, what?

Millennials are now the largest group of Americans outnumbering Baby Boomers (nearly 90 million strong) by an estimated 20 million. Their presence can no longer be overlooked. It’s estimated that they will have the most buying power by 2017 and for the next 40 years after that.

Not only do nonprofits have to make their missions and projects more engaging to Millennials, but they also need to get them excited about social change.

That’s just it. How exactly do you encourage Millennials to care more about the environment? Beyond growing their own gardens, composting, recycling, and using sustainable materials.

Participant Media just launched a new channel YouTube channel, TakePart TV. The channel “serves as a digital home for clever, eye-opening and optimistic content around big issues that face our planet for Millennials ranging from teens to thirtysomethings”. Clips like the Waterpocalypse Now video, from the Brain Food Daily series takes a humorous, more crass approach, but one has to wonder if these types of media really move audiences to action.

Ecoarttech, a unique organization “combining primitive with emergent technologies, to investigate the overlapping terrain between ‘nature’, built environments, mobility, and electronic spaces” may be on to something. Their current project Indeterminate Hikes+ is a mobile media app that “transforms everyday landscapes into sites of bio-cultural diversity and wild happenings”. Users map out a hike in a natural or urban setting and along the way are asked to perform small tasks, learning to appreciate the surrounding environment and notice the unique sits often overlooked.

Having the unique advantage of combining both visual art with environmental education, what can the Schuylkill Center take away from these two examples in order to engage Philadelphia young professionals about relevant environmental issues, such as stormwater run-off?

I’m on a self-made mission to find out.

Stay tuned for more blog posts from the Advisory Board, and more on the Millennial view on Environmental Art.