Community: Creative Connections at the Schuylkill Center

Lauren Bobyock, Environmental Art and Communications Intern

What does community mean to you? Here at the Schuylkill Center, community means connection. We offer a wide range of ways for humans of all ages and backgrounds to engage with nature—whether you are spending time with your family outside at our weekly Schuylkill Saturdays, or attending our Meigs Environmental Leadership Award ceremonies to learn about strides our community members take to further environmentalism. Our community contributes to the Schuylkill Center in a variety of ways, and we are excited to honor all friends, members, volunteers, and staff in an exciting and creative way this winter.

A crucial aspect of the Schuylkill Center is our Environmental Art department. Using art, we are able to seamlessly pair science with physical movement, history with inventive up-cycling, and math with textiles. Art bridges the gap between all facets of life, and we especially value how it is connected to the environment.

Our gallery has been the home for a vast number of environmental art projects since its expansion in 2013. We’ve incorporated animals, mythology, botany, kinetic energy, architecture, geology, fashion, local history, and the Schuylkill Center itself as topics for many environmental projects. But none of these projects were created alone. Contributions from nature and humans made each gallery piece possible.

Community

Hayley Crawford’s “Love leaves.” uses materials from nature to display a love for local surroundings. Displayed in Community, 2017.

 

Community

Laura’s “Un Cerf Magique” captures a moment in nature using illuminating colors highlighting the magic and fantastical scenes found outside. Displayed in Community, 2017.

Art connects people to each other and to the environment, and these connections contribute to creating the invaluable community that we are lucky enough to consider a Schuylkill Center family. For the second time (after an extraordinary success), we are excited to invite our community to fill the gallery with their own works this February as we celebrate your dedication to the Schuylkill Center and your creative works. Community, this unique upcoming exhibition, will feature artwork of anyone and everyone involved with the Schuylkill Center. We welcome all art mediums—clay, weaving, photography, woodwork, painting, dance—the possibilities are endless. Read more about our guidelines and how to submit work here (deadline January 6).

Community

Kelsey Wimmenaur’s “Water Series 2/3” uses bodies of water as inspiration to express the comfort received from water in nature. Displayed in Community, 2017.

When previously done in 2017, we saw this exhibit bring the Schuylkill Center community to life like never before. Barriers were broken and expectations exceeded, and we look forward to seeing what our community has in store for us this time around. Community will be on view in the gallery from February 21 through April 27, 2019. An opening reception will be held on February 21, 2019.

Autumnal Stream Walk

By Lauren Bobyock, Communications and Environmental Art Intern 

It was the perfect fall day to get a little lost in the woods. There are two parallel streams running through the valleys at the Schuylkill Center Meigs and Smith Runs and that day two teams of staff and volunteers set out to learn more about them. On an artistic and scientific mission, we began this journey to contribute to our latest environmental art gallery exhibit by Stacy Levy: Braided Channel.

Stream Water Gathering

Stream Water Gathering

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stacy Levy is an environmental artist with installations all over the world including the Schuylkill Center (read more here). Levy’s vision for Braided Channel includes multiple video screens that display a sample of her site-based works in action. Additionally, she organized this gathering of water samples to construct a “water library” of sorts to tell the story of these local streams. Our findings unearthed details about Meigs and Smith Runs that we never would have understood without delving further into them.

Stream Gathering

We began near Hagy’s Mill road and followed both streams down to the Schuylkill River Trail, taking a water sample approximately every 130 feet. Both teams began this journey with a bit of bushwhacking to find our starting points. It quickly turned into a lot of bushwhacking with the realization that we literally had our skin in the game! Our spirits high, we sojourned on, delighted to spend several hours in the woods. The time passed quickly as we filled our backpacks with Ziploc bags of water samples as we drank in the splendor of the forest and stream.

Stream Gathering

Stream Gathering

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With 340 acres to explore, it’s easy to overlook our two stream corridors. Especially since most of the streams are off limits except for two access points on Smith Run for educational purposes; a condition of the conservation easement on the property.  There is no trail to Meigs Run. Ravine Loop offers ample opportunity to enjoy a view of Smith Run, although we ask visitors to remain on the trail to avoid damaging these sensitive habitats.

With special permission from the Land and Facilities Department we were able explore these unique sections of the property for the exhibit.  Our walks led us to note some important discoveries about these streams and the land surrounding them. We found four-foot high clay banks, gravel bars, and massive bedrock carved by the continual flow of water. Old deer fencing from abandoned restoration projects lay upon beautiful open hillsides. We experienced changing elevations and temperatures as we moved from forested canopy to open clearings. We met crayfish, frogs, and even a snake along the way. Our discoveries included sites of mass erosion, crumbling stone foundations, lots of moss, dams, and boulder-sized quartz rocks. All of our findings led us to a deeper understanding of the hydrology of the forest and we documented it for Stacy Levy’s display.

Stream Water GatheringStream Water Gathering

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stream Water Gathering

Stream Water GatheringStream Water Gathering

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There was much to note on our journey and our efforts were an important contribution to Levy’s exhibit. Braided Channel is open in the gallery now through February 2nd. Stop in to see the water samples and learn more about our discoveries!

Stream Water Gathering

webelos into the woods

Ten Good Things about Trees

by Mike Weilbacher, Executive Director

I’ve been thinking about trees a lot these last few weeks, in part because the leaves are turning color and falling to the ground, something I look forward to every year. But also because the Schuylkill Center just found evidence of emerald ash borers on our massive property, something that is deeply troubling, as we are now faced with hundreds of dead and dying trees.

And because not far from the Schuylkill Center, a sister nonprofit cleared about an acre of trees to make room for a playground. Playgrounds, of course, are wonderful things, but losing a whole acre of trees is, for me, the director of an environmental center, hard to stomach.

Because we just lost an acre of ecosystem services, something tough to come by in this environmentally challenged world.

And because, at day’s end, there are 10 great things trees do for us.

First, trees are natural air conditioners. Walking into the Schuylkill Center forest on a hot summer’s day, the temperature immediately drops. The ground is shaded by trees, and that umbrella of leaves protects the soil from the sun’s scorching rays. Trees are literally cool.

Trees also filter air pollution, pulling bad stuff out of the leaves—urban smog, say—and putting fresh air back into the world.

Those same leaves are air fresheners; when they pull pollution out of the air, they replace it with oxygen, one of the requirements for life. So leaves are oxygen factories, renewing our air. Two mature trees, it is frequently said, provide the oxygen needs of a family of four. That acre of trees that just came down? That’s the oxygen needed for about 18 people to breathe. They’ll have to get it elsewhere.

But while making oxygen, those leaves are also pulling in carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, the stuff that flows out of our tailpipes in car exhaust and is supercharging our atmosphere. Trees mitigate climate change: the more trees we have, the better our chances of surviving and beating climate change. Philadelphia hopes to plant a million trees in the next few years, and the Schuylkill Center has been doing its part in planting new trees on our property. This will not only improve the city’s smog but help us address the scourge of climate change.

Everyone in Roxborough has been talking about stormwater in recent years, how the climate’s larger storms flood our streets with too much rainwater. Manayunk has a lot to say about climate change’s impact on flooding, as Manayunk too frequently receives Roxborough’s stormwater. A tree, amazingly, addresses stormwater—a mature tree’s large umbrella of thousands if not millions of leaves slow down rainfall, allowing water to trickle to the ground slowly long after the storm has moved on. And tree roots act like sponges to mop up water, the tree’s dead leaves on the ground underneath the tree also sopping up stormwater. Cool beans: the more trees in our landscape, the better we can address the increasingly intractable problem of stormwater.

Trees provide food for all kinds of creatures. A dogwood tree’s bright-red berries are eaten by some 90 species of creatures, including many birds who crave it in the nutrient-starved winter months when the berry is smartly ready. Black cherry fruits are craved by many kinds of birds; acorns are eaten by thousands of species of animals, not just squirrels.

A tree is also habitat, home to millions of living things. A woodpecker digs out a home in a trunk; that hole is later co-opted by a screech owl or raccoon. Squirrels are nesting high in the branches, chipmunks in the roots underneath, bats are behind the peeling bark (and those bats are eating the mosquitoes in your yard; trust me—you love bats.)

Winter’s coming, and trees can also help you address the cold north winds. Planting evergreen trees on your northern exposure can reduce that wind—trees lower your heating bill. (Yes, trees cool your house in the summer and warm it in the winter!)

Trees, of course, are aesthetically pleasing, lovely to look at—and healing. Evidence indicates that we are hardwired to relax when looking at greenery, so sitting in your yard surrounded by trees can actually lower your blood pressure and calm and soothe you. Trees are healing.

And the 10th good thing about trees: money actually grows on trees. According to the USDA, a large tree in front of a house increases that home’s sales price by about $7,130, and if that tree is part of a beautiful, well-kept landscape, your home’s value increases by about 10 percent. Plant trees and your home gets a higher resale value.

So, Roxborough, plant away!

Halloween Hikes and Hayrides

At nighttime, we go to bed. (That’s what I tell the kids, at least). We are diurnal mammals, awake only during the day. The Schuylkill Center’s annual Halloween Hikes & Hayrides on October 26 & 27 gives us a chance to be nocturnal, if only for a moment, and to give children the thrill of exploring their senses in what my son calls, “the deep, dark forest”. While we’re there, we learn animal facts from friendly creatures (our own environmental educators dressed up in handmade costumes) and take a hayride to admire the moon. All of the “treats” given are the non-edible variety (like stickers and erasers), but at the end of the evening, there’s always a chance to roast a marshmallow, relax by the fire, and bite into an oozy s’more.

Celebrate the season with us!

Hallow Hikes_staged (36)2016 Hallow Hikes_Liz Jelsomine (31)

Art as Environmental Leadership: Stacy Levy to receive the Meigs award

By Christina Catanese, Director of Environmental Art

Rain Yard

Every year, the Schuylkill Center gives the Henry Meigs Environmental Leadership Award to a deserving environmental professional for leaving a meaningful and lasting impact on their community and our region, and embodying a spirit of leadership, integrity, and vision.

In twelve years, we’ve never given this honor to an environmental artistbut that changes this year. On November 7th, Stacy Levy will be presented the Meigs award for her pioneering work joining the worlds of art and science throughout her career of creating compelling artwork, both site-specific and gallery-based.

In Levy’s words, she “use[s] art as a vehicle for translating the patterns and processes of the natural world.” Today, creating novel modes of revealing natural systems and solving ecological challenges have become critical, and artists have an important role to play in connecting people with nature. Levy is among the preeminent environmental artists working today, and is unmatched in the elegance with which her work reveals ecological processes that otherwise may go unnoticed.

She has broken new ground in working not just in but with the environment. Along with showing how nature works, Levy has created many projects that solve environmental issues in a place. For an example of this, we need look no further than out the back door of our Visitor Center, where we can experience Rain Yard, Levy’s 2013 artwork which manages stormwater runoff from our roof. Operating in this intersection, Levy has a spirit of collaboration and uncanny ability to galvanize community members and specialists across disciplines.

After being presented the award, Levy will be joined by a panel for a discussion on the intersection of art, science, and the environment particularly through the lens of water. Then, we’ll celebrate the opening of a new installation by Levy in our gallery with a reception.

We recognize that environmental leadership can take many forms, and in this year’s Meigs award, look forward to celebrating how artists can shine as environmental leaders.

 

 

Bodies of Water: Dance at the Schuylkill Center

By Christina Catanese

 

This weekend, the Schuylkill Center will be presenting Remembering Water’s Way by Dance Exchange, the first site-specific dance event that the Center has commissioned in over a decade.

Dance Exchange is a DC-area arts organization that has been one of the Schuylkill Center’s LandLab artists in residence over the past year.  The goal of the LandLab residency is for artists to engage audiences in the processes of ecological stewardship through scientific investigation and artistic creation. So we tasked these performers to also create art-based installations that prevent or remediate environmental damage, and it’s exciting to see how they have responded to the challenge.

Dance Exchange’s work engaging individuals and communities in dancemaking and creative practices is driven by these four questions:

Who gets to dance? Where is the dance happening? What is the dancing about? Why does it matter?

When Dance Exchange was selected for this residency, I was excited to discover what the answers to these questions might be in the context of our work connecting people with nature.

The culmination of Dance Exchange’s research and artmaking will take place on October 13th and 14th with animated hikes through our grounds that follow the story of water. Exploring ponds, streams, erosion-prevention efforts, and impacts from recent storm events, these hour-long experiences will weave together performance, installation, science engagements, and more. Think guided nature walk punctuated by performed dance in the landscape, with led opportunities to interpret information (both scientific and sensory) into your own body and in collaboration with others.

One of Dance Exchange’s core beliefs is that anybody can and should dance, which is why the dancers not only perform for the audience, but get everyone moving. (Even those who claim to have two left feet.) The artists guide us through ways to embody the scientific concepts that we’re learning about. They also value intergenerational exchangeso all ages are welcome! This walk will give people across generations the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding ofand connection totheir local environment and community. Through this immersive experience, participants will activate their senses and observation skills through an artistic and ecological approach to discovery. Activities are designed to move participants along a path of recognition, appreciation, and stewardship of the environment. There will even be ways in which the performers will contribute to our land restoration work through the performance.

The title, Remembering Water’s Way, comes from a recognition that the land has a memory of how water has flowed through it, and an acknowledgement of how we can reconsider our relationship to the land to be guided by water rather than trying to fight it. Over the course of the walk, many stories of water will be explored (locally on the Schuylkill Center’s grounds as well as in the context of our regional watershed), including the impact of recent rains and ever-more intense storms that our region has experienced this summer.

As a dancer and choreographer myself, I’m excited by how we can use our bodies in nature to reframe and activate a site. By positioning human bodies in the landscape and experiencing it with all senses, perhaps we can start to see and feel ourselves as slightly more connected to nature, rather than separate.

So, my answers to the Dance Exchange questions so far are 1) everyone; 2) anywhere; 3) information from many realms outside of dance; and 4) because it helps bring us closer to that content, and to each other. But you may have your own answers (and more questions) after experiencing their work.

Please join us for Remembering Water’s Way this weekend. The walk will be offered four times over the course of the weekend, at 11am and 2pm on both Saturday, October 13 and Sunday, October 14. The guided walk will descend some elevation; good walking shoes are recommended. Keep an eye on the Schuylkill Center’s website and social media for any weather-related changes.

Andorra’s Lance Butler grows mightly mussels

mike's mussel story

 

While Roxborough is famously home to numerous civil servants, especially cops and firemen, Andorra’s Lance Butler has among the most unusual city jobs.

He’s growing mussels. Thousands of mussels. To place back into the Schuylkill and Delaware rivers. And it’s surprisingly important work.

A senior scientist in Philadelphia Water’s Office of Watersheds, Lance was staring into a microscope last Thursday afternoon, measuring and assessing the health of baby mussels no larger than a grain of sand. He was sitting in a laboratory, what he calls “a living breathing laboratory,” tucked into the back of the Fairmount Water Works, Philly Water’s great museum of the city’s water history housed in the iconic building below the Art Museum. The lab doubles as the Mussel Hatchery, an exhibit in the Water Works where you can visit to learn about mussels too — and sometimes see Lance working.

The unassuming white plastic buckets that surrounded him on shelves, with a spaghetti tangle of clear plastic hoses running into and out of them, held thousands of baby mussels in various stages of their life cycles. Freshwater mussels are bivalves, two-shelled mollusks like clams and oysters, cousins of the marine versions you eat in marinara. Lance says these creatures are “bio-sentinels, the canaries in the river’s coal mine,” as they crave fresh, clean water, but have no ability to escape a pollution event — they can’t pick up and move away. If pollution strikes a river, mussels are doomed.

Consequently, over 70 percent of the world’s 700 mussel species are at risk of extinction, and freshwater mussels are among the most endangered American animals. Many were extirpated — made locally extinct — in the Delaware River basin, hence Lance’s project. But why does this matter? And why is the city spending money on this?

“Mussels have a huge impact on water quality,” Lance told me while unscrewing a jar containing baby yellow lamp mussels. As mussels anchor themselves in a river’s bottom and filter algae out of the water, “one mussel filters 10 to 20 gallons of water a day. With a million mussels in a river, that’s 20 million gallons of water. They remove nutrients, they remove solids, making the water more clear, and they remove harmful things like E. coli and other bacteria.”

Water is cleaner and safer for us because of the work of mussels.

That’s the key to why the city is investing in this. In addition to restoring to our rivers the plants and animals that belong there, Lance says, “mussels save money. If our water is cleaner going into our intake pipes, cleaning the water is easier and cheaper for the Water Department.” So spending money here saves money elsewhere.

And if you love to fish in the Schuylkill, you’ll especially love mussels. He says mussels practice “terraforming,” changing their habitat. “With mussels filtering the water, its clarity improves. Light can shine deeper into the water, so there is more submerged vegetation. And the plants hold sediment down, making better habitat for fish.” So the more mussels we have, the better the river is for fish (and fishing).

He also opened a larger lamp mussel for me, showing me a dark section inside the small soft body of what is a mother mussel. The dark spot was actually thousands of glochidia, larval mussels, hiding inside the mother. These larvae don’t have the bivalve shells and look like completely different organisms — but they are what hatches from mussel eggs. When the glochidia are ready for the next phase, some mama mussels have lures that attract the correct host fish over, and the female “spits” the glochidia at the fish, the larvae attaching themselves to the gills of the fish, “snapping like Pacman onto its gills.” And the larval mussels go for a ride.

“This is how they disperse themselves throughout a habitat,” he told me. “The fish are their Uber ride upriver.”

When ready, the glochidia transform again into small mussels and drop to the river bottom — where some species might live for as many as 100 years!

So the Mussel Hatchery also includes fish like yellow perch, the unwitting host in this extraordinary project. This week, Butler and other project scientists from the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary and the Academy of Natural Sciences will be discussing what happens to the 15,000 baby mussels now stored in holding ponds at several locations in the region, all products of this process. Ultimately, they will begin releasing mussels back into the wild. And hope they take.

Lance is also senior scientist in the long-awaited restoration of the Manayunk Canal, a project which is moving ahead and “should go out to bid next year. The canal will turn into a beautiful amenity for the community.” One of the project’s goals is to get water flowing back into and out of the canal again, to reconnect it to the river from which it has been severed. And mussels will definitely be a part of the picture.

Philly Water maintains a website, “The Mighty Mussel,” to learn more about this project (mightymussel.com), and for school teachers intrigued by this, mussels can visit your classroom as well, and your school can help bring mussels back to our rivers.

Visit the Mussel Hatchery soon, and perhaps you’ll see Roxborough’s own Lance Butler performing his critical work, bringing mighty mussels back to Philadelphia rivers.

Mike Weilbacher directs the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education in Upper Roxborough, tweets @SCEEMike, and can be reached at mike@schuylkillcenter.org This blog was originally published in the Montgomery News September 5.

NATURAL SELECTIONS: Art in the Open: Selections from 2018 at the Schuylkill Center

By Christina Catanese

A mysterious, vine-woven figure recently appeared behind the Schuylkill Center’s Visitor Center building. Though lacking facial features or limbs per se, it feels human-ish and appears to gaze over the hill into the forest.

This sculpture, created by Brooklyn-based artist Anki King, was the first piece from our fall exhibition to be installed this summer. King harvested vines from the Schuylkill Center property while they were still growing strong in the height of the August growing season for maximum benefit to the ecosystem as well as pliability.

Over the next few weeks, nine more artists will install their work in our environmental art gallery before the show officially opens on Sept. 13. Their work spans a diverse range of practices and materials – along with this vine sculpture, there will be on display wet plate collodion photography, weavings from discarded textiles, ceramic tiles with embroidery details, drawings, polaroids, cyanotypes, printed monotypes and more.

What these works have in common is that all of the artists were 2018 participants in Art in the Open, a public art program in which selected artists create their work on Philadelphia’s Schuylkill Banks for three days. We are pleased to be offering these artists the opportunity to adapt their work to our spaces, continuing our partnership with this citywide program for the third time.

Akin to King, Sivan Ilan utilized unconventional materials in her work, challenging their typical perception as waste or undesirable materials. A master’s student in textile design at Philadelphia University, she created large woven panels made exclusively from scrap fabric found in the university’s studios.

Mia Rosenthal and Christopher Wood present different kinds of drawings which shed light on how a place participates in the drawings themselves.

Rosenthal created detailed ink drawings of items that she found on the ground on the River Trail, as well as in her neighborhood playground. These meticulous portraits of local detritus reveal something about the character of their place.

Wood, in addition to continuing his Daydrawing series (in which he has completed a new powdered graphite drawing each day since Jan. 1, 2016), experimented with ways that the environment could participate in the drawings. He left paper with graphite in various locations on the trail, sometimes weighted with different objects, and allowed the weather and place to shape the material.

Looming large in the room will be a place-specific sculpture transplanted into the gallery by Matt Greco and Chris Esposito. This team participated in Art in the Open for the third time together this year and created an aggrandized form of a bollard – those posts used to secure a ship to a dock with ropes, a ubiquitous element from the Schuylkill River’s shipping history. Blowing this often overlooked object up to a size that cannot be ignored forces reflection on how this industrial legacy may still be felt today.

These works and more draw inspiration from place in a variety of ways, and the particular location of Art in the Open, between the Schuylkill River and the deeply urban built environment of Center City Philadelphia, offers an opportunity for artists to comment on and complicate the relationship between people and nature. Transplanting these works to the Schuylkill Center site, which also borders the River Trail about 10 miles north of the Art in the Open site, gives us a chance to consider these relationships from yet another angle.

Please join us to meet the artists at the opening reception of Art in the Open: Selections from 2018 on Sept. 13 at 6 p.m. Enjoy artist talks, light refreshments in the gallery and a short walk to the outdoor installation. Art in the Open: Selections from 2018 will be on view through Oct. 27.

Christina Catanese directs the Schuylkill Center’s environmental art program, tweets @SchuylkillArt. This blog was originally published in the Montgomery News August 29.

Into The Woods

Into The Woods

By Ben Vlam

I spent this summer serving as a Fellow for the Alliance of Watershed Education, representing The Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education. I’ve been coming to the Schuylkill Center for camp since I was six years old, and I worked here as a CIT/Aftercare Counselor for five summers.

What made this experience so different, other than the actual content of the work, was my awareness and appreciation of what the Schuylkill Center offers. I realized how alive and harmonious this place is and it definitely kept me on my toes, whether I was be sawing through dead trees to move them off the trails, tracking down camp groups for photos, or designing a interpretive signage.

There are a few things I can attribute to the success of The Schuylkill Center. First of all, the staff play a crucial role. This is a place where people really care about each other and the work they’re doing. People were invested in my work and I was invested in other people’s work. You make memories here that last a lifetime.

Another important aspect is the property itself. I walked these trails quite a bit while I was planning, writing about, and filming videos of a watershed loop. I found myself taking breaks just to sit at the ponds and listen for different kinds of animals. When I recorded my videos, (check them out here) I just placed the camera down and let it record. I didn’t need to look for specific things because so much was going on around me. Frogs hopping, dragonflies buzzing in and out of the shot, pollinators stopping at flowers.

The last thing that really clicked for me this summer is how all the trails are really connected. Despite me being sort of a lifer, this is the first summer where I really learned these trails like the back of my hand. Knowing the twists and turns, I’ve realized how much of they eventually feed into each other, like tributaries. I found myself at peace and relaxed.

I guess my big takeaway this summer was really to be thankful for everything you have and to try and live without regrets. I’m incredibly thankful for the Schuylkill Center for existing, my co-workers who are now friends, and for the opportunities during this fellowship to teach, laugh, sweat, and most importantly, learn.

I guess my only regret is that this didn’t last longer.

 

 

Watershed Fellow writes Eco-Drama as Summer Project

As a fellow for the Alliance for Watershed Education at the Schuylkill Center, work has felt more like an adventure. Every day I experience something new. From planting trees to picking wineberries, this summer gave me the opportunity to explore my passion for the environment. I got the chance to combine some of my favorite subjects: art, nature, theater, and education. I gained a wealth of knowledge as I supervised campers and taught them what I had learned. I employed my artistic skills as I tracked groups on trails, photographing their expeditions. I also aided Kate Farquhar and laura c carlson in installing their works of art. From helping these creatives, I was exposed to new insights that showed me the distinct overlap between the arts and the environment. The theater that I experienced was a product of my own desire to fuse drama and nature for my Watershed capstone project.

My project began as a survey of the area surrounding the Schuylkill Center. I went online and in-person to find and persuade people to take my survey. The findings illustrated the demographics of the area as well as individual sentiments about nature and diversity. No one had a negative association with either word and the respondents saw both as necessary. I used this information along with my own abilities to inform the second half of my capstone project. While surveying, I began to create a play about watershed education. It is called How the River Flows: an Eco-Drama and is part of an entire packet that seeks to teach and encourage people to put on this performance about nature. This packet will be available at the request of local schools so that they will be able to put on a contemporary play without being charged for the rights. This will promote watershed education in an affordable way that is relatable to people who do not see themselves as environmentalists.

From my two and a half months at the Schuylkill Center, I have learned lessons that will stick with me for the rest of my life.

  • Art is everywhere. It is not just on paper; it surrounds us.
  • Creativity is sometimes the best tool that you can use. It can come in handy when you least expect it.
  • Being practical does not limit your scope of the world. The effectiveness of pragmatism is beautiful because it allows for efficiency

I want to say thank you to the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education for gifting me with this valuable knowledge that I will carry on into my future.